Friday, March 04, 2011

Who Says Cooking and Genealogy Don't Mix

Hello All -

I have read an interesting post by Dick Eastman and a couple other folks about a tv program in the US called Top Chef. You might wonder why genealogist are interested in a cooking show. Well, in this latest episode of TC one of the challenges was to cook a dish that represents the contestant's heritage. The contestants were to travel to Ellis Island in New York City. Megan Smolenyak worked behind the scenes to research the five remaining contestant's family history. One of the interesting things about it was the two of the contestants were related (distant cousins from Italy). It is good to see genealogy being seen in other areas. I wouldn't have expected it on a cooking show.

If you haven't seen this episode you can view it here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hE30EX63NkI (Part 1)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJ9k0nAbLtE (Part 2)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VrJH61i4-go (Part 3)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2X0Mqzn7dLw (Part 4)

The program links have been put into four segments. Part 2 is really where you can see the contestants learning about their ancestry.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

I've always thought it would be interesting for a family to research its origins and then make a traditional/holiday meal that their ancestors would have made in the past. Would be a fun, educational gift idea for children. Or, for grandparents, you could recreate meals from their childhoods using traditional ingredients.

Megan Smolenyak Smolenyak said...

Thanks for sharing this! Was loads of fun to do the research!

Eva Butler said...

My favorite thing is adding favorite recipes of my family members, especially my ancestors. To my Family Tree Program. Some were my gr gr grandmother's. which I like believing were also favorites given them by their mom's and other early ancestors also.
I have a very tiny little hand made recipe book with recipies that my great great grandmother had made herself. The cover is a piece of what looks like she had cut a piece off a box of cereal or what-ever. Then she cut small pieced of paper for pages and sewed them to the cover. I sm quite certain it was made during the Civil War when paper was very scarce. There is a note on one page in witch she wrote that anyone trying to read her writing should please excuse her " hen
cratching" as she was using a hens foot to write with that Jen, (her husband)had given her to write with. It was the foot of the Chicken whose head he had just chopped off for their supper.
Eva But;er. of Michigan